Towards a new consensus on policing

Police

The Police Federation of England and Wales has published a collection of essays in which contributors explore different aspects of the question of what the landscape of policing could and should look like in the years to come.

POLICING in England and Wales is going through a period of profound change. The tough public spending settlement for policing is having an immediate impact upon police forces.

 

It may well act as a catalyst for changes which have long-been considered. Just as easily, it could lead to short-term decision-making which will have long-term and potentially detrimental consequences for forces and their communities.

 

The increasing focus on private sector involvement as one response to reduced budgets raises serious questions over accountability and transparency. Such issues cannot be viewed in isolation and inevitably lead to the important question of what the creation of Police and Crime Commissioners means for the traditional concept of police accountability.

 

That is why the Police Federation of England and Wales has published a collection of essays from a wide range of stakeholders and commentators on what the landscape of policing could and should look like in the years to come. Read More…

All in this together? Race and the recession

jobless written on typewriterA future that works has to work for all sections of society. It is quite clear that the Government’s current approach miserably fails this test.

 

According to the Labour Force Survey, unemployment among young people aged 16-24 stands at just under 22 percent. This is a staggering figure when you consider that it has almost doubled from its figure just five years earlier immediately prior to the beginning of the Great Recession. But this figure also hides some key differences for different ethnic groups. If a young person is white, there is a one in five chance that they will be out of work. If they are Asian, this prospect rises to over a quarter. For young people from the black community, there is an astonishing 50 percent chance that they will be unemployed.

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