Few Dads take Paternity Leave

Victoria Phillips is head of employment rights at Thompsons Solicitors

A new report has found that just ten per cent of new fathers currently take more than two weeks of paternity leave, just months before Shared Parental Leave comes into effect from next year.

 

The shared parental leave scheme will, for the first time, allow eligible mothers and their partners to take up to 52 weeks of leave in total, to be shared between them either in alternating blocks or taken together.

 

However, “Shared opportunity: Parental leave in UK business” found a number of cultural and financial differences explaining the low level of take up from Dads, and makes for sorry reading for anybody who believes in gender equality.

 

The report found that a father taking paternity leave was culturally less acceptable in many organisations. 63 per cent of employers were supportive of mothers taking up to a year’s maternity leave but even two weeks paternity leave was only supported by 58 per cent of employers.

 

Almost half of the employees surveyed and 58 per cent of managers said that parental leave was disruptive for their organisations. Three quarters of managers felt parental leave affected the efficiency and productivity of their teams and at managerial level just two per cent opted to take the leave they are currently entitled to.

 

The findings may be hardly surprising when it appears that fathers are paid significantly less on average by their employers when on leave. While 70 per cent of new mothers received full pay for between one and 38 weeks of maternity leave, just nine per cent of new fathers received full pay for longer than two weeks when on paternity leave.

 

This “paternity pay gap” not only creates practical financial barriers to the concept of shared parental leave, it also projects a negative cultural expectation (that women are the ones likely to take extended periods away from the workplace) and that has the potential to impact detrimentally on their career progression.

 

We are on the verge of welcome changes in legislation, but rights are only of use if there is an understanding that they are there to be used and using them has no negative implications for the user. Sadly it appears there remains an ingrained view in many organisations that childcare is for mothers and that reflects badly on ‘modern Britain’.

 

To access the Institute of Leadership and Management, please visit: https://www.i-l-m.com/~/media/ILM%20Website/Documents/research-reports/shared-leave/ilm-shared-parental-leave-report%20pdf.ashx

 

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